Health FAQs

What should I know about over-the-counter medications?
My child has diarrhea, what should I do?
When should my children be immunized? What immunizations should they get?
How do I get my prescription refilled?
Can I get an antibiotic prescribed over the phone without being seen first?
What should I know about teething?
When do my child’s teeth come in?

What should I know about over-the-counter medications?

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications are medications that can be bought without a doctor’s order. Many OTC medications can be very dangerous to your child if taken incorrectly. We recommend that all parents read about common OTC’s on the American Academy of Pediatrics web site.

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My child has diarrhea, what should I do?

Diarrhea can last from 2 days to 2 weeks.  The intestine is a sponge that absorbs nutrients and the stool normally comes out formed.  With diarrhea, the intestine looses it’s mucosa (sponge) and becomes a slide.  Most nutrients go out without being absorbed.  Diarrhea usually carries intestinal acids causing diaper rash around the anus.

Most uncomplicated cases go away on their own without treatment, except extra fluids to prevent dehydration. Testing for the specific cause of diarrhea is usually not necessary unless there are bloody stools or you have traveled to areas or ingested food where bacterial diarrheas and parasites are common. Antidiarrheal medications should usually be avoided in children. If the diarrhea persists or profuse, comes with vomiting, or for more than two weeks, or has blood or mucus in it, then your child should see the doctor. Also see the doctor if diarrhea is accompanied by high fever. For more information on diarrhea visit the KidsHealth web page. Give your infant or child Pedialyte for the first 12 hours and then you can offer a lactose-free milk or soy milk.

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When should my children be immunized? What immunizations should they get?

We have a vaccine schedule available online that covers birth to age 18. Click here to go to our vaccine page.

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How do I get a prescription refilled?

You should begin by calling your pharmacy. The pharmacy will contact our office for the necessary authorization. You should allow 48 hours for prescription refill requests.

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Can I get an antibiotic prescribed over the phone without being seen first?

No. We do not believe it is in the best interest of either the patient or the doctor’s office to prescribe medications over the telephone without first being examined by a physician for nature of the illness.

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What should I know about teething?

Teething in children usually begins between 4 and 7 months of age. Most teething babies start drooling a lot more and will begin putting their fingers or fist in their mouth. The two bottom front teeth usually appear first followed about 6 weeks later by the front upper teeth. By the time children reach 2 years of age they have 16 teeth. Teething babies might be comforted by chewing on a hard rubber teething  ring or a hard unsweetened teething cracker. Don’t use frozen teething objects because extreme cold might injure the tissue in your babies mouth, and frozen bagels or washcloth while effective can represent a choking hazard if pieces are chewed off. Teething gels do not work well because your baby’s drool wipes off those products from his gums. Contrary to the popular belief, fever, diarrhea and other symptoms are not caused by teething. Do not panic if your child’s teeth take time coming out. Every child is different and so are their teeth. We recommend reading the page about teething on the American Academy of Pediatrics Web site.

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When do my child’s teeth come in?

Your child’s teeth should begin to come in between six and sixteen months. They will continue to come in until your child has all their twenty primary teeth. This is usually at age three. Putting your child to sleep with a bottle can cause cavities.

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